5 Women’s History Month Books for Kindergarten



"Lucia the Luchadora" by Cynthia Leonor Garza

 

Lucia zips through the playground in her cape just like the boys, but when they tell her “girls can’t be superheroes,” suddenly she doesn’t feel so mighty. That’s when her beloved abuela reveals a dazzling secret: Lucia comes from a family of luchadoras, the bold and valiant women of the Mexican lucha libre tradition. Cloaked in a flashy new disguise, Lucia returns as a recess sensation! But when she’s confronted with a case of injustice, Lucia must decide if she can stay true to the ways of the luchadora and fight for what is right, even if it means breaking the sacred rule of never revealing the identity behind her mask.


"Beautiful" by stacy McAnulty

 

Every girl is unique, talented, and lovable. . . .Every girl is BEAUTIFUL. Much more than how one looks on the outside, true beauty is found in conquering challenges, showing kindness, and spreading contagious laughter. Beautiful girls are empowered and smart and strong! BEAUTIFUL breaks barriers by showing girls free to be themselves: splashing in mud, conducting science experiments, and reading books under a flashlight with friends. This book will encourage all girls to embrace who they are and realize their endless potential.


"Brave Ballerina: The Story of Janet Collins" by Michelle Meadows

 

A lyrical picture book biography of Janet Collins, the first African American principal dancer at the Metropolitan Opera House. Janet Collins wanted to be a ballerina in the 1930s and 40s, a time when racial segregation was widespread in the United States. Janet pursued dance with a passion, despite being rejected from discriminatory dance schools. When she was accepted into the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo as a teenager on the condition that she paint her skin white for performances, Janet refused. She continued to go after her dreams, never compromising her values along the way. From her early childhood lessons to the height of her success as the first African American prima ballerina in the Metropolitan Opera, Brave Ballerina is the story of a remarkable pioneer as told by Michelle Meadows, with fantastic illustrations from Ebony Glenn. 

"Drum Dream Girl" by Margarita Engle, Rafael Lopez

Drum Dream Girl is the story of Millo Castro Zaldarriaga, a mixed race Cuban girl, who defied gender roles in the 1930’s music scene. The girl and her story show the importance of family, teacher, and music-education support to expose and develop our children’s musical talents.


"Rosie Revere, Engineer" by Andrea Beaty

 

Rosie Revere dreams of becoming a great engineer. She creates wonderful gadgets and gizmos – but only when no one is watching. She’s kept her inventions a secret ever since, when she was very small, her uncle Zookeeper Fred laughed at the special cheese hat she designed him to keep snakes at bay.

6 plus Women’s History Month Books for Kindergarten



"Fast Enough" by Joel Christian Gil

Fast Enough combines an imagined story of Bessie Stringfield as a young girl with historical facts about Bessie as an adult. Bessie Stringfield went on to become the first African-American woman to travel solo across the United States on a motorcycle.


"The Proudest Blue: A story about Hijab and Family by Ibtihaj Muhammad

With her new backpack and light-up shoes, Faizah knows the first day of school is going to be special. It’s the start of a brand new year and, best of all, it’s her older sister Asiya’s first day of hijab–a hijab of beautiful blue fabric, like the ocean waving to the sky. But not everyone sees hijab as beautiful, and in the face of hurtful, confusing words, Faizah will find new ways to be strong.


"My Name is Not Isabella" by Jenifer Crosberry

From breakfast to bedtime, a young girl imagines being different women who made history, and ends the day empowered to be herself. My Name is Not Isabella is a delightful new picture book by Jennifer Fosberry that introduces children to some of the strongest female figures in history, all seen through the eyes of a little girl.

"This is Sadie " by Sara O'Leary

Sadie is a little girl with a big imagination. She has been a girl who lived under the sea and a boy raised by wolves. She has had adventures in wonderland and visited the world of fairytales. She whispers to the dresses in her closet and talks to birds in the treetops. She has wings that take her anywhere she wants to go, but that always bring her home again. She likes to make things — boats out of boxes and castles out of cushions. But more than anything Sadie likes stories, because you can make them from nothing at all. For Sadie, the world is so full of wonderful possibilities … This is Sadie, and this is her story. 


"Delphine Denise and the Mardi Gras prize" by Brittany Mazique

Every year, Delphine Denise Debreaux and her friends ride their bikes together in the New Orleans Mardi Gras parade. But this year, there’s a shiny prize for best float―and Delphine Denise just has to win it. How can her friends remind Delphine Denise what the parade is really all about?


"superheroes are Everywhere" by Kamala Harris

In this empowering and joyful picture-book memoir that speaks directly to kids, Kamala Harris takes readers through her life and shows them that the power to make the world a better place is inside all of us. And with fun and engaging art by Mechal Renee Roe, as well as a guide to being a superhero at the end, this book is sure to have kids taking up the superhero mantle (cape and mask optional). 

6 Women’s History Month Books for Kindergarten

"Big Red Lollipop" by Rukhsana Khan

The book deals with sibling relations, specifically how older children cope with accommodating younger siblings and the pain the parents unwittingly subject them to while trying to teach them to share and include their little sister or brother. Rubina is excited to receive her first invitation to a birthday party.


"Spaghetti in a Hot Dog Bun" By Maria Dismondy

 

Lucy is teased by a boy at school because she is different. She has the courage to be true to herself and to make the right choice when that same boy needs her help.


"Ho'Onani Hula Warrior!" by Heather Gale

 

Based on a true story, Ho’onani: Hula Warrior is a celebration of Hawaiian culture and an empowering story of a girl who learns to lead and learns to accept who she really is–and in doing so, gains the respect of all those around her.

"Ruth Bader Ginsburg" by Shana Corey

The book deals with sibling relations, specifically how older children cope with accommodating younger siblings and the pain the parents unwittingly subject them to while trying to teach them to share and include their little sister or brother. Rubina is excited to receive her first invitation to a birthday party.


"lali's Feather" by Farahan Zia

Lali finds a little feather in the field. Is it lost? Lali sets out to find feather a home, but one bird after another rejects it. The feather is too small for Rooster, too slow for Crow, and too plain for Peacock. Once Lali decides to keep the little feather and discovers all the things she can do with it, the other birds begin to recognize its value.  


"Maya Lin: Artist-architect of Lights and Lines" by Jeanne Walker Harvey

Maya grew up with art and learned to think with her hands as well as her mind. From her first experiments with light and lines to the height of her success nationwide, this is the story of an inspiring American artist: the visionary artist-architect who designed the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Funny Books to Read Aloud for Kindergarteners

Add Your Heading Text Here

When her dog disappears into the gutter of the book, Bella calls for help. But when the helpers disappear too, Bella realizes it will take more than a tug on the leash to put things right. Cleverly using the physicality of the book, This book just ate my dog! It is inventive, ingenious, and just pure kid-friendly fun!

Ernestine is beyond excited to go camping. She follows the packing list carefully (new sleeping bag! new flashlight! special trail mix made with Dad!) so she knows she is ready when the weekend arrives. But she quickly realizes that nothing could have prepared her for how hard it is to set up a tent, never mind fall asleep in it, or that swimming in a lake means that there will be fish — eep! Will Ernestine be able to enjoy the wilderness, or will it prove to be a bit too far out of her comfort zone? In an energetic illustrated story about a first sleepover under the stars, acclaimed author-illustrator Jennifer K. Mann reminds us that opening your mind to new experiences, no matter how challenging, can lead to great memories (and a newfound taste for s’mores).

Add Your Heading Text Here

Wombats are cuddly-looking, slow-moving Australian animals. Their favorite activities are eating, sleeping, and digging holes. Here, in the words of one unusually articulate wombat, is the tongue-in-cheek account of a busy week; eating, sleeping, digging holes . . . and training its new neighbors, a family of humans, to produce treats on demand. This entertaining book, with its brief, humorous text and hilarious illustrations, will endear the wombat to young children, who may recognize in the determined furry creature some qualities that they share!

Today is the day Nanette gets to get the baguette! Is she set? YOU BET! Mo Willems’ hilarious new picture book, Nanette’s Baguette, follows our plucky heroine on her first big solo trip to the bakery. But . . . will Nanette get the baguette from baker Juliette? Or will Nanette soon be beset with regret? Set in a meticulously handcrafted-paper-modeled French village, the uniquely vibrant laugh-out-loud world of Nanette’s Baguette may be Mo’s best creation yet. Get set to crack into an irresistible tale you won’t soon forget!

 

In this hilarious and clever “how-to,” a little girl and a know-it-all narrator are thwarted by a cat who refuses to take a bath. The perfect read-aloud for fans of Snappsy the Alligator and Interrupting Chicken. Seems simple, right? One problem: the cat has no intention of doing ANY of these things! Watch as the steps keep changing, the cat keeps escaping, the girl keeps eating cookies and the mess keeps escalating. Soon it’s not just the cat who needs a bath–it’s the whole house! This spoof on an instruction manual features an increasingly bewildered human, a nonchalant cat and a know-it-all narrator . . . who really doesn’t know it all. How DO you give a cat a bath? Read on to find out!

It isn’t always easy working from home. Luckily, Mom’s little one is a natural boss at keeping her organized, leading meetings, and making calls—or so it seems. But when Mom starts looking frazzled, will her helper know what to do? Diana Murray’s rollicking rhyme paired with Cori Doerrfeld’s energetic illustrations will bring parent and child together after a long workday at home. 

Best friends Cake and Ice Cream love having fun and going to parties! But when Ice Cream tries to get his way by being bossy and loud, he feels all alone. With Cake’s help, he has an important realization which changes his bossy ways…and becomes his sweet, soft self again! 

Why would a camel want to be a unicorn? Did she eat too many unicorn cupcakes? What could possibly be the problem? Come along on this fun and silly adventure and find out just why My Camel Wants To Be a Unicorn. You might be surprised….

 

.

Zoey knows you don’t need to go to the shore to have the perfect beach day…but you do need a great imagination and a treasure map! Will Zoey lead her barnyard pals to buried treasure? Chicken on Vacation is a Level One I Can Read, which means it’s perfect for children learning to sound out words and sentences. Whether shared at home or in a classroom, the short sentences, familiar words, and simple concepts of Level One books support success for children eager to start reading on their own.

The story begins with the troubles that Leprechauns are known to impose like glitter and green toilets. Then we follow the Leprechaun to various homes where he reveals different traps, but he’s too quick to be caught. In the end, the Leprechaun admits that one day, one brilliant child will design a perfect trap!

Frog truly believes he is a unicorn. He has a rainbow-colored (clip on) tail, a pretty horn (party hat), and he can fly, too (on the swings). Goat keeps telling Frog he is NOT a unicorn. But when you truly believe—POOF, sometimes magic happens. Read this adventurous book to find out what happens on his curious journey!

It’s showtime on Old Mac Donald’s Farm! The barnyard animals are putting on a play—a farm version of “The House That Jack Built”— but other animals keep taking the stage and interrupting the production. First some rambunctious monkeys, then breakdancing kangaroos . . . there’s even a pair of singing elephants. Everyone knows that monkeys, kangaroos, and elephants do NOT belong on a farm . . . so what to do?

We all know dragons are terrible, but this one is especially terrible. He scribbles in books. He steals candy from baby unicorns. He even burps in church. Seriously, who does that? Dragon, that’s who. The king, the knights, and the villagers are desperate to take down this beast once and for all. But sometimes it’s up to the unlikeliest of heroes to tame a dragon this terrible.

He’s back, and bigger than ever! My humongous hamster heads to school in this sequel, and hilarity ensues. He eats all the packed lunches; he twirls in dance class; he plays hopscotch and takes a turn on the slide. But at the end of the day, he’s tired, and so he shrinks back to normal hamster size . . . until the next time he’s humongously hungry!

6 more Women’s History Month Books for Kindergarten


"Malala's Magic Pencil" by Malala Yousafzai

As a child in Pakistan, Malala made a wish for a magic pencil that she could use to redraw reality. She would use it for good; to give gifts to her family, to erase the smell from the rubbish dump near her house. (And to sleep an extra hour in the morning.)  


"Dancing Hands" by Margarita Engle and Rafael Lopez

In soaring words and stunning illustrations, Margarita Engle and Rafael López tell the story of Teresa Carreño, a child prodigy who played piano for Abraham Lincoln. As a little girl, Teresa Carreño loved to let her hands dance across the beautiful keys of the piano.


"Luchadora and the Million masks!" by Cynthia Leonor Garza

Lucía’s little sister Gemma wants to be a luchadora like her big sister, but she is more bumble and splat than pizzazz and seems to find trouble wherever she goes. When Gemma makes a ginormous hole in Lucía’s special silver mask, Lucía is incredulous and exasperated at how her little sister seems to get away with everything. But Lucía’s grandmother, Abu, has an idea: a trip to the mercado to get Gemma her very own lucha libre mask. 


"All the Way to Top" by Annette by Pimental

The book deals with sibling relations, specifically how older children cope with accommodating younger siblings and the pain the parents unwittingly subject them to while trying to teach them to share and include their little sister or brother. Rubina is excited to receive her first invitation to a birthday party.unwittingly subject them to while trying to teach them to share and include their little sister or brother. Rubina is excited to receive her first invitation to a birthday party.


"Sofia Valdez, Future Prez" by Andrea Beaty

In SOFIA VALDEZ, FUTURE PREZ, young Sofia is prompted to take action to clean up a local landfill when her loving abuelo is hurt while they’re out helping their neighbors. She decides to turn the dump into a park, but when she visits City Hall, everyone tells her she can’t get that done because she’s just a kid. Sofia refuses to take no for an answer and shows the world that second-graders should be taken seriously when they talk, especially when they say they want to make a difference in the world.

 


"Shark Lady" by Jess Keating

This is the story of a woman who dared to dive, defy, discover, and inspire. This is the story of Shark Lady. Eugenie Clark fell in love with sharks from the first moment she saw them at the aquarium. She couldn’t imagine anything more exciting than studying these graceful creatures.

Blog Demo

At Choreography by Rae, we read books to kids ages 4-6 five days a week during Storytime Adventures.

The Camping Trip by Jennifer K. Mann  is another book I learned of courtesy of A Might Girl

Our kids love reading about animal adventures in the forests, but being a global class it came as no surprise that many of our kids had never been camping. Growing up my camping trips were few and far between: a Girl Scout trip that I was invited on even though I wasn’t a Girl Scout, 6th grade science sleepaway camp, and a camp counselor stint in High School. I think that equals 3 maybe 4 times that I’ve donned a sleeping bag and slept under the stars. My spouse on the other hand has less than fun memories of being the Boy Scouts, trying to start a fire and eating raw food. Pretty sure the food wasn’t supposed to be raw. It’s the lack of experience in camping which makes this books so awesome.

Jennifer K. Mann does a great job showing how the “idea” of camping can be different from the reality and that different is okay. Every kiddo in our class could relate to having a home made forte of some sort (blankets, connecting sticks, magna tiles) and the process of building a homemade forte is a breeze compared to setting up a real tent in the woods. Our main character Ernestine quickly learns that the many adventures that nature holds aren’t that different from things she would do living in the city. 

 

Lessons to Share

Add Your Heading Text Here

1) Try something new.

Kids can be resistant to trying new foods, a new teacher, and even being the first person to “go” in Simon Says. As Ernestine tries new things, she discovers that many of those new things aren’t as bad as she thought they might. She even discovers a few that she loves! Like eating S’mores.

2) It’s okay to be different.

As a vegan, I’m no stranger to the weird looks you get when someone dines with you and learns that you don’t eat meat. I always warn guests that I’m cooking for what’s on the menu, and I do wonder if Aunt Jackie gave Ernestine a heads up about mealtime, but honestly Ernestine is a kid and probably either forgot how Aunt Jackie cooks or never paid attention. Either way, I was tickled to see cousin Samantha announce that “tofu dogs” are her favorite. I remember giving Tofu dogs to my own niece when she was a kid.

The difference in eating is handled wonderfully in The Camping Trip. No long explanations or justifications, just a simple, this is dinner and this is different. 

Also bonus points for hearing one our kids shout, “I love tofu dogs!”

3) It’s okay to be afraid.

Let’s face it, when kids get afraid, most grown ups are quick to soothe those fears. As a teacher, I deal with navigating kid fears daily. I like that Aunt Jackie doesn’t go into a long conversation with Ernestine on how she’s feeling. Instead Aunt Jackie invites the kids to take a moment to look at the stars. This allows Ernestine to navigate her own emotions and find her own grounding. Aunt Jackie is a pretty smart cookie.

I also like that cousin Samantha offers to hold hands when jumping in the water together. Because let’s face it, somethings feel less scary when you know you have a partner.

4) It’s okay to miss our loved ones.

Ernestine quickly learns that just because she’s not with Daddy, doesn’t mean that she is loved any less.

Representation Shout Out!

  • This book features an African American family
  • Veganism/ Vegetarianism is mentioned without pushing an agenda
  • We never see 2 parents together. This can mean many things or nothing at all. It’s a wonderful way to show that every family is different.

Add Your Heading Text Here

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

This is an honest review from a book lover and educator. I do not make commission off of the sale of this book. Be sure to check your local bookstore or your local library for a copy. Libby is an amazing App that connects to many libraries throughout the U.S.A.

The Camping Trip by Jennifer K. Mann

At Choreography by Rae, we read books to kids ages 4-6 five days a week during Storytime Adventures.

The Camping Trip by Jennifer K. Mann  is another book I learned of courtesy of A Might Girl

Our kids love reading about animal adventures in the forests, but being a global class it came as no surprise that many of our kids had never been camping. Growing up my camping trips were few and far between: a Girl Scout trip that I was invited on even though I wasn’t a Girl Scout, 6th grade science sleepaway camp, and a camp counselor stint in High School. I think that equals 3 maybe 4 times that I’ve donned a sleeping bag and slept under the stars. My spouse on the other hand has less than fun memories of being the Boy Scouts, trying to start a fire and eating raw food. Pretty sure the food wasn’t supposed to be raw. It’s the lack of experience in camping which makes this books so awesome.

Jennifer K. Mann does a great job showing how the “idea” of camping can be different from the reality and that different is okay. Every kiddo in our class could relate to having a home made forte of some sort (blankets, connecting sticks, magna tiles) and the process of building a homemade forte is a breeze compared to setting up a real tent in the woods. Our main character Ernestine quickly learns that the many adventures that nature holds aren’t that different from things she would do living in the city. 

 

Lessons to Share

1) Try something new.

Kids can be resistant to trying new foods, a new teacher, and even being the first person to “go” in Simon Says. As Ernestine tries new things, she discovers that many of those new things aren’t as bad as she thought they might. She even discovers a few that she loves! Like eating S’mores.

2) It’s okay to be different.

As a vegan, I’m no stranger to the weird looks you get when someone dines with you and learns that you don’t eat meat. I always warn guests that I’m cooking for what’s on the menu, and I do wonder if Aunt Jackie gave Ernestine a heads up about mealtime, but honestly Ernestine is a kid and probably either forgot how Aunt Jackie cooks or never paid attention. Either way, I was tickled to see cousin Samantha announce that “tofu dogs” are her favorite. I remember giving Tofu dogs to my own niece when she was a kid.

The difference in eating is handled wonderfully in The Camping Trip. No long explanations or justifications, just a simple, this is dinner and this is different. 

Also bonus points for hearing one our kids shout, “I love tofu dogs!”

3) It’s okay to be afraid.

Let’s face it, when kids get afraid, most grown ups are quick to soothe those fears. As a teacher, I deal with navigating kid fears daily. I like that Aunt Jackie doesn’t go into a long conversation with Ernestine on how she’s feeling. Instead Aunt Jackie invites the kids to take a moment to look at the stars. This allows Ernestine to navigate her own emotions and find her own grounding. Aunt Jackie is a pretty smart cookie.

I also like that cousin Samantha offers to hold hands when jumping in the water together. Because let’s face it, somethings feel less scary when you know you have a partner.

4) It’s okay to miss our loved ones.

Ernestine quickly learns that just because she’s not with Daddy, doesn’t mean that she is loved any less.

Representation Shout Out!

  • This book features an African American family
  • Veganism/ Vegetarianism is mentioned without pushing an agenda
  • We never see 2 parents together. This can mean many things or nothing at all. It’s a wonderful way to show that every family is different.

This is an honest review from a book lover and educator. I do not make commission off of the sale of this book. Be sure to check your local bookstore or your local library for a copy. Libby is an amazing App that connects to many libraries throughout the U.S.A.

One Word from Sophia by Jim Averbeck

At Choreography by Rae, we read books to kids ages 4-6 five days a week during Storytime Adventures.

I learned of this book courtesy of A Might Girl while searching for a few extra books to round out Black History Month. Our kiddos loved this fun read, but warning it’s jam packed with lessons that can be overlooked. We’re actually eager to read this one a second time this semester.  The kids loved helping me identify an appropriate household pet. They also loved talking about what they saw in the pictures. In fact, when I tried to save time but not asking about a picture, one 4 year old said, “Ms. Rae you didn’t ask what we saw on the last page. I want to tell you about the picture I liked.” Surely, I couldn’t deny such a request.

If you’re thinking of adding this book to your collection, then go for it. Below are some tips on why you should read this book to your curious kiddos, and you’ll find information what this book is not about. Sometimes grown ups get wrapped up their own ideas and can miss some awesome messages.

Lessons to Share

1) Be curious about Big Words.

My first thought was… “Big words?! These kids won’t understand these words” and I did read a negative review stating that point. What the reviewer seemed to miss was that reading stories is how we introduce young readers to vocabulary. The big words in this book are all given a definition and our main character often asks “what does that mean?” This is a wonderful way to spark curiosity and conversation with your kids. The character Sophia is just like them, she has no idea what those fancy words mean, but she’s asking. Also the grown ups answer her question. They don’t tell her to be quite or anything dismissive. Emoji’s and texting abbreviations are great but I’m also watching first hand a generation that has poor spelling, communication, and vocabulary skills ( I work with older kids and teens as well). There’s also a misconception that people of color wouldn’t understand big words. So thanks Jim Averbeck for giving this smart character some big words to be curious about. 

2) There are many ways to say the same thing. Everyone tells Sophia the same thing in a different way. A nice reminder to kids that there can be more than one word for the same thing and you can ask for the same thing in many different ways.

3) Understanding what is reasonable and realistic.

Sophia asked for something ridiculous. Our kids had a great time identifying what makes a good household pet and what doesn’t. 

Sophia uses very well thought out arguments to support her requests for something that is absolutely ridiculous. This invites our kids to think about what they want and why they want it. Kids see toys all the time that they want, but they can’t really say why it is that they want it. Sophia is showing our kids that if you really want something think about why you want it. Even if it’s a completely ridiculous request you might get it.

4) Positive role models. This book features a family of color. Everyone has an important job and everyone deals with important decision-making daily. Grand-mama doesn’t have a job but she’s no pushover. The fact that Sophia has adjusted her argument to her audience also introduces for young readers the concept of knowing your audience. Recognizing that we don’t always asks people for the same thing in the same way.

5) Don’t over do it.

The story wraps up with “short and sweet” can get you what you want, and this is true. We point out that Sophia gets her requests not because she threw a tantrum, not because she cried, not because she wanted it, but because she thought carefully about why she wanted something and asked in a nice way. Sometimes kids can go on and on, just excited to have a listener or even feeling like they have to provide an explanation to justify what they want. I work with adults in their teens who often give long explanations for simple yes or no questions. This is a very important lesson for young women. Women historically have had to work harder to get what they want. Sophia does a lot of work to address any argument that might not be in favor of saying yes to her request. Ask for what you want, be prepared to say why once you know if more information is needed.

Misconceptions About The Book

1 ) This books send the message that “Sophia should talk less.”

Nope. This character is smart and each person she presents her argument to recognizes this. They even compliment Sophia on her presentation. The also speak to her in an intelligent way. No one belittles Sophia. A friend of mine used to say think say there’s being smart, and there’s thinking smart. Sophia is smart and shows it. She’s thinking smart by changing her argument for her audience. She finally realizes that her family loves her and didn’t need her to provide a long argument on why she wanted what she wanted.

2) This book shows adults shutting down a young girl.

Shutting down is a pretty strong term, but it’s exactly what one reviewer claimed. Kids ask for things all the time and adults say yes or no. What Sophia is asking for is completely ridiculous. For our storytime we went over what is an acceptable household pet. The kids do not expect Sophia to get what she wants. This is what makes the ending fun. Our kids know that they aren’t going to be able to get a unicorn or anything else by crying and saying please. That’s not the point of the story. Kids understand that asking for something ridiculous is going to get an answer of “No” from adults. Sophia is praised in the book for her thought out arguments. Like Grand-mama says, “get to the point.” That’s a life lesson for adults too. I have team members giving long explanations why they want a day off or can’t pick up a shift. Get to the point, because sometime short and sweet will get you what you want.

3) That’s a bad word!

I did have a kid get upset by the word “poop.” I appreciate any book that aims to normalize bowel movements. This was an opportunity for me to remind our kids that everyone poops and for our story we are talking about giraffe poop. We are not using “bathroom talk” to be naughty or silly

Our kids loved this book and the number of lessons learned are plenty.

This is an honest review from a book lover and educator. I do not make commission off of the sale of this book. Be sure to check your local bookstore or your local library for a copy. Libby is an amazing App that connects to many libraries throughout the U.S.A.

Lucia the Luchadora

Choreography by Rae

Lucia the Luchadora

Read Aloud with Rae 5/15: Lucia the Luchadora by Cynthia Leonor Garza

By Rae Wilson

Can girls be super heroes?  Can super heros wear pink? What makes a super hero a super hero? Lucia learns the power of being herself and empowering others as this Friday’s Read Aloud with Rae invites your young detective to explore Cynthia Leonor Garza’s Lucia the Luchadora.

The reading starts at 2pm EST/ 11am PST on Friday 5/15 and runs approximately 25 minutes.

RSVP online to save your kiddos spot. Space is limited. Be sure to try logging on a few minutes early. It is hard to admit friends once the session has started.

All reading sessions are free. Donations are welcome as they help with Book Club cost (books, staff, marketing, tech software).

Does your child enjoy reading? Add this book to your home library.

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases

Preparing for our Read Aloud:

– Play pirates! Anyone can be a pirate and there are a ton of dress up options.

– Print out the free coloring sheet and let your book detective do some coloring before the reading session. Kids will have a chance to show their pictures at the beginning of class.

– Print out the free crossword puzzle. 3rd and 4th graders will get a kick out trying to find the words from today’s story. 

Coloring sheet.

Let’s Play Pretend

After the Reading Session:

– Keep the conversation going! Invite your child to imagine you are both on an adventure.

– Invite your stuffed animals to join you for a healthy snack.

– Draw your family tree. Challenge your child to remember as many families members or friends that they can and draw a tree around all the names.

– Play dress up. Pretend to be the hero in your own story.

Jabari Jumps

Choreography by Rae

Jabari Jumps

Read Aloud with Rae 5/1: Jabari Jumps by Gaia Cromwell

By Rae Wilson

Trying something new can be super exciting, especially when you’ve practiced and prepared. But can accomplishing your goals be exciting and scary at the same time? Jabari faces his fears as this Friday’s Read Aloud with Rae invites your young detective to explore Gaia Cromwell’s Jabari Jumps.

The reading starts at 2pm EST/ 11am PST on Friday 5/1 and runs approximately 25 minutes.

RSVP online to save your kiddos spot. Space is limited. Be sure to try logging on a few minutes early. It is hard to admit friends once the session has started.

All reading sessions are free. Donations are welcome as they help with Book Club cost (books, staff, marketing, tech software).

Does your child enjoy reading? Add this book to your home library.

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases

Preparing for our Read Aloud:

– Play pirates! Anyone can be a pirate and there are a ton of dress up options.

– Print out the free coloring sheet and let your book detective do some coloring before the reading session. Kids will have a chance to show their pictures at the beginning of class.

– Print out the free crossword puzzle. 3rd and 4th graders will get a kick out trying to find the words from today’s story. 

Coloring sheet.

Let’s Play Pretend

After the Reading Session:

– Keep the conversation going! Invite your child to imagine you are both on an adventure.

– Invite your stuffed animals to join you for a healthy snack.

– Draw your family tree. Challenge your child to remember as many families members or friends that they can and draw a tree around all the names.

– Play dress up. Pretend to be the hero in your own story.

Sign Up for more fun online events